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Other Colored Stars

All of these compositions were pulled off 'Practical Pyrotechnics', an internet site containing lots of valuble information.

 

 

Orange star #1
Source: "The Pyroguide" (a document found on internet)
Comments: Dangerous mixture since it contains both sulfur and a chlorate.
Preparation: Bind with alcohol.

Strontium nitrate.................................36
Sodium oxalate....................................8
Potassium chlorate................................5
Shellac powder....................................5
Sulfur............................................3

Orange star #2
Source: rec.pyrotechnics
Comments: These compositions are part of a matched set invented by Robert Veline. The compositions mix compatibly to produce a wide range of other colors. Examples are given below. The wood meal in the prime (see miscellaneous compositions) makes the stars a little 'fuzzy', making the stars much more easy to ignite. Without the wood meal prime the stars are often blown blind.
Preparation:

Potassium Perchlorate.............................75
Cryolite..........................................10
Shellac...........................................15

Orange/Red star
Source: rec.pyrotechnics archive. Posted by Greg Deputy <gdep@gemstar.gemstar.com
Comments: Sculpy is a PVC based modelling clay - "FIMO" will also work, but is more difficult to mix.
Preparation:

Strontium nitrate.................................35
Potassium perchlorate.............................40
"Sculpy"..........................................22
Fe2O3.............................................2

Salmon color star
Source: rec.pyrotechnics, post by Greg A. Gallacci <psygreg@u.washington.edu
Comments: Sculpy is a PVC based modelling clay. The result is a salmon-berry (reddish-orange) color.
Preparation: Warm the sculpy slightly, to make it more mixable and mix it with the ammonium perchlorate without using solvents. Screen it several times and make pressed stars. The stars can be baked in an oven at 135°C for 20 minutes, which will result in much harder, more ignitable, more intensely colored stars. Heating the stars is not recommended though, since it could cause the stars to ignite.

Ammonium perchlorate..............................75
"Super Sculpy"....................................25

Brilliant white star
Source: "The Pyroguide" (a document found on internet)
Comments: Bind with dextrin in water
Preparation:

Potassium perchlorate.............................4
Aluminum dust.....................................4
Dextrin...........................................1

Veline's red star
Source: rec. pyrotechnics, post by Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloyds@fiscalinfo.com. This set of compositions was invented by Robert Veline and is used in Kosankie's 'Chemistry of Fireworks (Chemistry of color) class'.
Comments: These compositions are part of a matched set invented by Robert Veline. The compositions mix compatibly to produce a wide range of other colors. Examples are given below. The wood meal in the prime (see miscellaneous compositions) makes the stars a little 'fuzzy', making the stars much more easy to ignite. Without the wood meal prime the stars are often blown blind.
Preparation: Summary of Robert Veline's own comments: "Potassium perchlorate is a fine powder. Parlon is Hercules brand or Superchlon brand from Ishihara co. ltd. Red gum is a fine powder. Copper(II)oxide may be substituted by copper carbonate without much change in performance. Calcium carbonate is 200 mesh, 'Whiting'. More pure forms slow the burn rate and degrade the color."

Potassium perchlorate.............................55
Strontium carbonate...............................15
Parlon............................................15
Red gum...........................................9
Magnalium (50/50), 200 mesh.......................6
Dextrin...........................................+4

Veline's orange star
Source: rec. pyrotechnics, post by Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloyds@fiscalinfo.com. This set of compositions was invented by Robert Veline and is used in Kosankie's 'Chemistry of Fireworks (Chemistry of color) class'.
Comments: These compositions are part of a matched set invented by Robert Veline. The compositions mix compatibly to produce a wide range of other colors. Examples are given below. The wood meal in the prime (see miscellaneous compositions) makes the stars a little 'fuzzy', making the stars much more easy to ignite. Without the wood meal prime the stars are often blown blind.
Preparation: Summary of Robert Veline's own comments: "Potassium perchlorate is a fine powder. Parlon is Hercules brand or Superchlon brand from Ishihara co. ltd. Red gum is a fine powder. Copper(II)oxide may be substituted by copper carbonate without much change in performance. Calcium carbonate is 200 mesh, 'Whiting'. More pure forms slow the burn rate and degrade the color."

Potassium perchlorate.............................55
Calcium carbonate.................................15
Parlon............................................15
Red gum...........................................9
Magnalium (50/50), 200 mesh.......................6
Dextrin...........................................+4

Veline's green star
Source: rec. pyrotechnics, post by Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloyds@fiscalinfo.com. This set of compositions was invented by Robert Veline and is used in Kosankie's 'Chemistry of Fireworks (Chemistry of color) class'.
Comments: These compositions are part of a matched set invented by Robert Veline. The compositions mix compatibly to produce a wide range of other colors. Examples are given below. The wood meal in the prime (see miscellaneous compositions) makes the stars a little 'fuzzy', making the stars much more easy to ignite. Without the wood meal prime the stars are often blown blind.
Preparation: Summary of Robert Veline's own comments: "Potassium perchlorate is a fine powder. Parlon is Hercules brand or Superchlon brand from Ishihara co. ltd. Red gum is a fine powder. Copper(II)oxide may be substituted by copper carbonate without much change in performance. Calcium carbonate is 200 mesh, 'Whiting'. More pure forms slow the burn rate and degrade the color."

Potassium perchlorate.............................30
Barium nitrate....................................24
Barium carbonate..................................15
Parlon............................................15
Red gum...........................................5
Magnalium (50/50), 200 mesh.......................11
Dextrin...........................................+4

Veline's blue star
Source: rec. pyrotechnics, post by Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloyds@fiscalinfo.com. This set of compositions was invented by Robert Veline and is used in Kosankie's 'Chemistry of Fireworks (Chemistry of color) class'.
Comments: These compositions are part of a matched set invented by Robert Veline. The compositions mix compatibly to produce a wide range of other colors. Examples are given below. The wood meal in the prime (see miscellaneous compositions) makes the stars a little 'fuzzy', making the stars much more easy to ignite. Without the wood meal prime the stars are often blown blind.
Preparation: Summary of Robert Veline's own comments: "Potassium perchlorate is a fine powder. Parlon is Hercules brand or Superchlon brand from Ishihara co. ltd. Red gum is a fine powder. Copper(II)oxide may be substituted by copper carbonate without much change in performance. Calcium carbonate is 200 mesh, 'Whiting'. More pure forms slow the burn rate and degrade the color."

Potassium perchlorate.............................55
Copper(II)oxide...................................15
Parlon............................................15
Red gum...........................................9
Magnalium (50/50), 200 mesh.......................6
Dextrin...........................................+4

Veline's mixed colors
Source: rec. pyrotechnics, post by Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloyds@fiscalinfo.com.
Comments: These are a few examples of the colors that can be obtained by mixing a few of Robert Veline's set of star compositions.
Preparation:

Yellow............................................55 green, 45 orange
Chartreuse........................................80 green, 20 orange
Aqua..............................................80 green,20 blue
Turquoise.........................................55 green, 45 blue
Magenta...........................................50 red, 50 blue
Maroon............................................85 red, 15 blue
Peach.............................................60 orange, 25 red, 15 blue
Purple............................................5 orange, 15 red, 80 blue